African Parks: Celebrating Leaders in African Wildlife Conservation

December 22, 2019

An incredible organisation devoted to African wildlife conservation, African Parks deserves to be recognised, appreciated and celebrated for their continued work in various parks and reserves across the continent.

African Parks (AP) is a non-governmental organisation that works collaborates with governments and local community partners with the aim of rehabilitating and management of mandated wilderness areas throughout Africa. From Zambia to Rwanda to Chad, African Parks is currently actively invested in 16 parks in 10 countries covering 12 million hectares that each have their particular contexts in terms of wildlife conservation and park management.

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Founded 2000, the organisation was driven to respond to the dramatic decline of protected areas due to poor management and lack of funding. Critically, in a continent plagued by lack of stable economic development and poverty, particularly among its indigenous communities, African Parks places emphasis on relieving these burdens. This is to create parks that are ecologically, socially and financially sustainable in the long-term.

We take a look below at two of their successes achieved in 2019, which are both in areas we organise safaris to:

Rhinos relocated to Akagera National Park, Rwanda

This year, five black rhinos who were born and raised in zoo environments in Europe, were transported from the Czech Republic, United Kingdom and Denmark to Akagera National Park in eastern Rwanda. For these rhinos, this is their first time living in a habitat that they should be, the wilderness.

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One of the black rhino in a boma before release in Akagera National Park, Rwanda in 2019 © Scott Ramsay / African Parks

These animals are highly endangered due to the demand, predominantly in Asian countries, for their horns, which has led to heavy poaching and just 5000 black rhinos left in the wild today. African Parks is fighting back against the devastation this illegal trading has caused the black rhino population through such initiatives.

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One of the black rhino released in Akagera National Park, Rwanda in 2017 © Scott Ramsay / African Parks

This is not the first time African Parks has led such an important translocation of black rhino in Akagera. In 2017, a collaborative effort between African Parks, RDB and the Howard G. Buffett Foundation resulted in the successful reintroduction of 18 Eastern black rhinos from South Africa to Akagera. For the first time in a decade, the park and the country once again became a refuge for this species.

Lion returned to Liuwa Plain National Park, Zambia

In western Zambia, a positive joint effort between African Parks, the Department of National Parks and Wildlife, the Barotse Royal Establishment and the Zambian Carnivore Programme, saw a collared male lion safely returned to Luiwa Plain National Park. After venturing south of the park boundaries into the Kalabo District, it spent four days wandering through the wider Game Management Area.

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The lion pride in Liuwa Plains National Park, Zambia © Daan Smit / African Parks

Conflict between animals and community is an ongoing challenge wherever there is highly dense human settlement near to a park. People understandably have an issue when wildlife, particularly predators, either kill livestock or a member of their community. Fortunately, in this case, no harm came to either community members or animals.

Contact us about tailoring a safari to one of the destinations mentioned above or others in our portfolio, and we can discuss how going on safari can make a positive impact towards African wildlife conservation.

Note: These are most certainly not all the achievements and improvements African Parks made in the parks and reserves under their mandate in Africa over the course of the year.


Posted by tfhadmin


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